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Article
April 1934

STUDIES OF THE BLOOD IN NORMAL PREGNANCY: VI. PLASMA CHOLESTEROL IN MILLIGRAMS PER HUNDRED CUBIC CENTIMETERS, GRAMS PER KILOGRAM AND VARIATIONS IN TOTAL AMOUNT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO; ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, the St. Louis Maternity Hospital, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the University of Chicago, and the Chicago Lying-in Hospital and Dispensary.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;53(4):540-550. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160100062004
Abstract

Although many of the reports of determinations indicate that cholesterol is increased in pregnancy, there is still lack of agreement as to the time when the increase begins, the amount and the cause of the gain. Greater importance is being ascribed to cholesterol, as shown by the constantly increasing number of papers on this subject in the literature. It is not known just what part it plays in the permeability of membranes, edema, nephritis, nephroses, pregnancy, resistance to infection, epilepsy, etc., but sufficient data have been accumulated to indicate that a marked change in cholesterol is intimately associated with these conditions, which undoubtedly are either the cause or the result of the change.

Cholesterol is found in both the erythrocytes and the plasma, occurring as the free alcohol and also as the ester of the fatty acids. In addition, certain other combinations or adsorption products of cholesterol and serum protein

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