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Article
May 1934

ETIOLOGY AND SYMPTOMS OF NEUROCIRCULATORY ASTHENIA: ANALYSIS OF ONE HUNDRED CASES, WITH COMMENTS ON PROGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;53(5):633-648. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160110002001
Abstract

The term "neurocirculatory asthenia," adopted in America during the World War, and synonymous with the less satisfactory British expression "effort syndrome," was applied in an attempt to classify a large number of persons having symptoms referable to the cardiovascular system not dependent on any known pathologic process of the heart or blood vessels but often associated with a functional nervous disturbance. These symptoms were chiefly palpitation, shortness of breath, precordial pain or discomfort and exhaustion. One or more associated symptoms were often present: faintness, syncope, headache, dizziness, insomnia, increased perspiration, difficulty in swallowing, tremor, flushing and pallor. The borderline between the normal and the abnormal is ill defined, but neurocirculatory asthenia may be said to be present when the symptoms appear during such customary physical activities and excitements of daily life as previously caused no symptoms or which in the average person produce no symptoms.

Neurocirculatory asthenia is of great

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