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Article
June 1934

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: XX. CHEYNE-STOKES RESPIRATION AS THE CAUSE OF PAROXYSMAL DYSPNEA AT THE ONSET OF SLEEP

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Departments of Medicine and Physiology, Vanderbilt University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;53(6):891-910. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160120085009
Abstract

The starting point of our observations was the fact, noted in a previous study,1 that patients who complained of seizures of dyspnea at the onset of sleep frequently were observed to have periodic breathing. This was in accord with the statement of Sir James Mackenzie,2 who wrote:

Another form of distressed breathing is Cheyne-Stokes respiration. Many elderly people exhibit Cheyne-Stokes respiration without being conscious of it. But in certain forms of heart failure it may occur and becomes so marked that the patient's rest is disturbed during the period of increased breathing. This is preceded by a period when the breathing almost ceases or completely ceases; it may be for a period of half a minute to a minute during which the patient may fall asleep to be awakened up, it may be by a sense of suffocation; on its resumption the breathing is often exaggerated.... Occasionally the

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