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Article
July 1934

ETIOLOGY OF HODGKIN'S DISEASE: II. SKIN REACTION TO AVIAN AND HUMAN TUBERCULIN PROTEINS IN HODGKIN'S DISEASE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

Fellow in Medicine of the National Research Council.

From the Department of Pathology, the University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(1):11-17. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160130014002
Abstract

The etiologic relationship of Hodgkin's disease (lymphogranulomatosis) and tuberculosis remains uncertain. Most of the investigations designed to solve this problem have been the experimental injection of diseased tissues into animals or cultural studies. Injections of "pure" Hodgkin's tissues do not regularly produce tuberculosis in animals, and cultures of the same tissues only occasionally yield a growth of acid-fast bacilli. The reports of L'Esperance1 claiming that tissues histologically typical of Hodgkin's disease produced tuberculosis in chickens—an animal species not previously used for this purpose—gave a new impetus to such studies. Utz and Keatinge2 stated that they had confirmatory evidence. Van Rooyen,3 Garrod,4 Stewart,5 Wallhauser6 and I7 failed to confirm the findings of L'Esperance. Numerous early investigators of Hodgkin's disease performed tuberculin tests on some of their patients in an effort to obtain information on the relationship of the two diseases. As early as 1902 Reed8 observed that the tuberculin tests performed

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