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Article
July 1934

MORPHOLOGIC VARIETIES OF BRONCHIECTASIS IN THE ADULT: THEIR PROBABLE PATHOGENESIS AND CLINICAL DIFFERENTIATION

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(1):131-144. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160130134009
Abstract

Pathologists have long described various forms of bronchial dilatation, such as cylindric, globular and saccular, but until recently no attempt was made to differentiate these bronchiectatic forms clinically. The introduction of iodized poppy-seed oil 40 per cent as a safe diagnostic means in the roentgenologic exploration of the bronchial tree made it possible to visualize and study the various morphologic types of bronchiectasis in the living and has led to an almost complete revision of the hitherto accepted views on the clinical aspects of the condition. Studies by Bezançon, Weil, Azoulay and Bernard,1 Reinberg2 and others have definitely established the fact that marked bronchiectasis may exist without bronchorrhea or cough, and that the amount of bronchial secretion bears no causative relation to the development of bronchial dilatation. Gauthier,3 Sergent and Jobin4 and others have drawn attention to the widely divergent ways in which bronchiectasis may manifest

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