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Article
September 1934

THE CHOLESTEROL AND VITAMIN A CONTENT OF THE LIVER IN MAN: A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED AND SIX LIVERS OBTAINED AT AUTOPSY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard), Boston City Hospital, the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(3):405-411. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160150092006
Abstract

Few data on the cholesterol content of the liver in man are available. In 1913, Grigaut1 found an average of 0.35 Gm. per hundred grams of human liver. In the following year, Landau and McNee2 recorded the cholesterol content of the liver in nine cases as varying from 0.18 to 0.46 Gm. per hundred grams of fresh liver. Since that time a few scattered observations have been reported. The most extensive study was made by Fex,3 who determined the content of cholesterol in the liver in twenty-two cases. He found that the normal range was between 0.254 and 0.396 Gm. per hundred grams, while in the pathologic liver the cholesterol varied from 0.241 to 0.43 Gm. per hundred grams.

The cholesterol content of the liver in one hundred and six cases in which postmortem examinations were made is reported in this paper. Incidentally, the same autopsy material

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