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Article
September 1934

ESSENTIAL FRUCTOSURIA: REPORT OF THREE CASES WITH METABOLIC STUDIES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the medical service of Dr. B. S. Oppenheimer and from the Laboratories of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(3):412-426. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160150099007
Abstract

Fructosuria, otherwise termed "levulosuria," was recognized soon after polarization of urines for the detection of sugar became common. In 1840, Biot1 first examined urine in the polariscope, but it remained for von Gorup-Besanez2 to describe in urine a "levorotatory noncrystallizable sugar that behaves like fructose." The early observers had no rapid accurate chemical test for the identification of fructose before Selivanoff3 introduced the use of concentrated acid and resorcinol for the identification of this sugar. Although the specificity of his test has been questioned many times, it is still an excellent method for detecting even very small quantities of fructose, alone or in the presence of other sugars, especially if the precautions outlined by Borchardt4 are followed.

We are able to add three new cases of fructosuria to the twenty-seven described in the literature since 1876, when the anomaly was first recognized.5 The only case

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