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Article
October 1934

UNILATERAL AND BILATERAL RESECTION OF THE MAJOR AND MINOR SPLANCHNIC NERVES: ITS EFFECTS IN CASES OF ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Neurosurgery (Dr. Craig) and Medicine (Dr. Brown), the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(4):577-596. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160160096006
Abstract

On the basis of postmortem investigation and theoretical consideration, section of the splanchnic nerves was suggested by Jean1 in 1921 for the relief of pyloric spasm, hyperacidity and hypersecretion. In 1923 Daniélopolu,2 considering the importance of the splanchnic nerves in the regulation of arterial pressure, conceived the idea of their resection in the treatment of hypertension. In the same year, Brüning3 suggested the same surgical procedure, and in 1924 Pende4 proposed before the Congress of Internal Medicine at Milan surgical treatment of arterial hypertension which consisted of resecting the left splanchnic nerves. In 1927 Pieri5 performed unilateral resection of the splanchnic nerves for intestinal atony. In 1930 Pieri,4 following the suggestion of Pende, successfully resected the left splanchnic nerves of two patients suffering from arterial hypertension. In 1932, Durante,4 of Genoa, resected the large and small left splanchnic nerves of two patients suffering from different arterial diseases. These cases were

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