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Article
November 1934

EFFECT OF THEOBROMINE ON PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Medical Services of St. Luke's and Cook County Hospitals.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(5):685-693. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160170028002
Abstract

For a number of years the purine-base group of drugs has been widely used in the treatment of angina pectoris. The fact that the symptoms of this disorder can often be relieved for long periods of time by these drugs1 seemed to indicate that they might be useful in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease.

Dock had noted that the pain of intermittent claudication was sometimes relieved by theobromine,2 and in the reports of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association it is stated that claims for the occasional relief of pain by theobromine and theophylline preparations in angina and similar lancinating pains may be permitted.3

Diseases of the peripheral arteries also offered the opportunity of estimating to some extent, at least, objective evidence of improvement as well as subjective relief of symptoms. The objective criteria employed were the simple ones usually used

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