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Article
November 1934

LATENT ACUTE RHEUMATIC CARDITIS AS DETERMINED AT AUTOPSY: ITS OCCURRENCE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Pathology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(5):799-804. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160170142011
Abstract

In routine autopsies at the Presbyterian Hospital, it has been occasionally observed that a patient dying of a nonrheumatic condition, and often with a history of never having suffered from rheumatic infection, nevertheless showed lesions in the heart indicative of this disease. A search through the literature failed to disclose any description of a series of such cases, although there were a few scattered references to this coincidence. Geipel1 recorded a case of contracted kidneys showing Aschoff bodies in the myocardium and an adherent pericardium. He also stated that Aschoff mentioned a case of Askanazy's in which scanty Aschoff bodies occurred although other signs of rheumatic infection were absent. Fraenkel2 described three cases of verrucous endocarditis (in one of which the myocardium contained numerous Aschoff bodies) in which there was no history of rheumatic infection. Pappenheimer and Von Glahn3 recorded two cases that had no history of

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