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Article
January 1935

STUDIES ON THE CORONARY CIRCULATION: III. EFFECT OF INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF DEXTROSE ON THE CORONARY CIRCULATION

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO.; LAWRENCE, KAN.

From the Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of Kansas School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;55(1):42-51. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.00160190045005
Abstract

The intravenous administration of dextrose has become an important therapeutic procedure. The use of dextrose in shock accompanying coronary thrombosis and in other forms of medical shock is now rather widespread. Marvin1 recently reported that injections of dextrose have been effective in the treatment of heart failure and cardiac disturbances brought about by diphtheria. Edwards and Page2 showed that intravenous injections of dextrose produce marked improvement in the action of hypodynamic hearts of dogs suffering from hypoglycemia produced by insulin. Middleton and Oatway3 found that diabetic patients suffering from anginal pains were frequently hypoglycemic or that the sugar level was below that usually found in diabetic patients. Root and Graybiel4 reported that in some patients the anginal pains are relieved by the intravenous injection of a solution of dextrose (20 cc. of a 50 per cent solution). Strouse, Soskin, Katz and Rubinfeld5 reported that in

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