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Article
March 1935

ELECTROCARDIOGRAM IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: REVIEW OF ONE HUNDRED AND SEVEN CLINICAL CASES AND ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHT CASES PROVED AT NECROPSY

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;55(3):457-483. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.00160210110010
Abstract

The number of clinical, pathologic and experimental observations published on coronary occlusion, its effect and its recognition attest the interest that exists in the subject and its importance as a clinical problem. The very multiplicity of these observations gives rise to the need for their critical evaluation and integration. It is the purpose of this article to make such an integration.

ANATOMIC CONSIDERATIONS  The first requisite to an understanding of the problem of coronary occlusion is a certain fundamental knowledge of the anatomy of the coronary arteries in the heart of man. The work of Whitten,1 Gross2 and Spalteholz3 on the coronary circulation covers the subject exhaustively. The anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery supplies the anterior portion of the left ventricle and apex and the anterior two thirds of the interventricular septum and gives off a few branches to supply a narrow zone of

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