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Article
May 1935

PITUITARY BASOPHILISMREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Departments of Internal Medicine and Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine and the New Haven Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;55(5):745-759. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.00160230038003
Abstract

Cushing1 recently described a syndrome characterized by obesity of unusual distribution, hirsuties, pigmentation of the skin, purpura, abdominal striae, hypertension, glycosuria and skeletal decalcification developing in relatively young persons, usually in women, whose complaints are chiefly amenorrhea, obesity, body pains and weakness. Many of this group of patients had previously been included in the group with adrenal tumor. Including his own cases and those in the literature, Cushing collected fifteen instances of this syndrome, in most of which a basophilic adenoma of the pituitary gland was noted at necropsy. He also reported other cases of the syndrome in patients who are still living. We wish to report in this paper a striking example of this syndrome, in which the condition was recognized during life and the diagnosis confirmed by postmortem examination.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —F. Q., a man aged 44, single, an editor and writer, entered the New

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