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Article
May 1935

CARDIAC PAIN: PRESENCE OF PAIN FIBERS IN THE NERVE PLEXUS SURROUNDING THE CORONARY VESSELS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Cardiovascular Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Michael Reese Hospital, and the Department of Physiology, University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;55(5):760-772. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.00160230053004
Abstract

The most generally accepted explanation for the occurrence of pain in angina pectoris is the theory of cardiac ischemia. This theory is supported by several lines of evidence (the recent literature is reviewed by Keefer and Resnik1 and Lewis2), one of which is based on animal experiments. This last type of evidence consists of the demonstration by Sutton and King,3 Pearcy, Priest and Van Allen4 and Sutton and Lueth5 of pain responses following occlusion of the coronary arteries in unanesthetized animals. These observers reported that pain was produced immediately on occlusion of the coronary arteries and that this pain ceased as soon as the vascular occlusion was released. Sutton6 stated: "In these experiments careful observations have been made on the effect of the temporary occlusion of the coronary arteries in unanaesthetized animals, with the conclusion that temporary occlusion results in immediate pain. It has been shown that this pain is

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