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Article
July 1935

TREATMENT OF CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE AND ANGINA PECTORIS BY TOTAL ABLATION OF THE NORMAL THYROID GLAND: XVI. THE SENSITIVITY OF MAN TO EPINEPHRINE INJECTED INTRAVENOUSLY BEFORE AND AFTER TOTAL THYROIDECTOMY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Service and Research Laboratories of the Beth Israel Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;56(1):38-58. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.03920010046003
Abstract

In an earlier communication which presented the therapeutic results following total ablation of the normal thyroid gland in patients with angina pectoris or congestive failure1 it was stated that "the manner in which relief is afforded by removal of the thyroid gland probably involves several different, though related, mechanisms. The decreased amount of work by the heart, the decreased metabolism of the heart itself, and the decreased sensitivity to epinephrine are some of the possible factors that are being studied." The purpose of this communication is to present studies of the latter factor, namely, the sensitivity of the cardiovascular system to epinephrine before and after total thyroidectomy. Three aspects of the physiologic action of epinephrine in man have been studied: (1) the sensitivity to epinephrine injected intravenously in patients with normal cardiovascular systems, angina pectoris or chronic heart failure; (2) the sensitivity to epinephrine of patients at various levels

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