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Article
July 1935

ACUTE CARDIAC INFARCTION INVOLVING ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR SURFACES OF LEFT VENTRICLE: ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Edward B. Robinette Foundation, Medical Clinic, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;56(1):77-87. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.03920010085005
Abstract

Twenty of our cases of acute coronary occlusion have come to necropsy during the past three years. In every instance the location of the infarct, predicted on the basis of the electrocardiogram, has been confirmed.1 This would indicate that when chest leads are used as well as limb leads the position of an acute infarct can be determined with considerable accuracy. The localizing signs of typical anterior and typical posterior lesions have been described in a previous paper.2 Moreover, the prognostic difference between the groups, mentioned in that paper, has been confirmed by further observations.1

Certain factors may confuse the observer in attempting to locate the lesion: 1. The infarct may occur in some unusual position, as in the lateral wall of the left ventricle or in the right ventricle. The localizing signs of such lesions are not definitely established as yet. 2. The patient may have

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