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Article
August 1935

OBSTRUCTING PERICARDITIS: EFFECT OF RESECTION OF THE PERICARDIUM ON THE CIRCULATION OF A PATIENT WITH CONCRETIO CORDIS

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Medicine of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;56(2):250-257. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.03920020042003
Abstract

The symptoms and signs of concretio cordis as a type of obstructing pericarditis were clearly described by Volhard and Schmieden1 in 1923. They measured the venous pressure and found that it was elevated. Beck and Griswold2 in 1930 were able to produce in dogs constricting pericardial scars associated with an elevated venous pressure, a diminished cardiac output, a small pulse and edema. Resection of these scars was followed by a fall in the venous pressure, a rise in the cardiac output and a diminution in the edema.

Burwell and Strayhorn3 in 1932 reported quantitative studies of the circulation in a young man subsequently proved to have concretio cordis. He exhibited a high venous pressure, a small pulse pressure and a diminished cardiac output per minute and per beat. Exercise was associated with an increase in the arteriovenous oxygen difference; but no increase occurred in the output per

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