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Article
August 1935

INCREASED EFFECTIVENESS OF INSULIN WHEN GIVEN BY INJECTIONS OF DOSES OF EQUAL UNITAGE AT INTERVALS OF TWO TO FOUR HOURS: USE OF INSULIN IN DIVIDED DOSES TO MANAGE SEVERE UNCOMPLICATED DIABETES AND TO CONTROL COMPLICATED MEDICAL CASES

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY

From the Laboratory of Pathological Chemistry and the Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospitals, the State University of Iowa.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;56(2):360-373. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.03920020152010
Abstract

The administration of insulin in divided doses, i. e., in injections of doses of equal unitage at two to four hour intervals day and night, was first used at University Hospitals in 1929 as an emergency postoperative measure. The results were sufficiently encouraging, and a further experimental study was made on 11 patients with uncomplicated diabetes in 1929-1930. These experiments indicated that insulin given in divided doses is much more efficient; that much less insulin is required; that the blood sugar level is more easily kept within satisfactory limits; that the glycosuria is more quickly controlled, and that hypoglycemic reactions rarely occur. The procedure has been of such great value that it has become a routine measure in managing severe uncomplicated diabetes which is difficult to control with two or three daily injections of insulin, in treating diabetes with associated acute infections and in handling postoperative cases. Of the 1,553

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