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Article
February 1936

PHARMACOLOGIC AND THERAPEUTIC PROPERTIES OF CRYSTALLINE VITAMIN C (CEVITAMIC ACID): WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO ITS EFFECTS ON THE CAPILLARY FRAGILITY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1936;57(2):241-274. doi:10.1001/archinte.1936.00170060003001
Abstract

The isolation of hexuronic acid from cabbages, orange juice and adrenal cortex by Szent-Györgyi1 in 1928 opened a new field for investigation, which culminated in 1932 with its identification as crystalline vitamin C, now termed cevitamic acid.2

This substance is an odorless, white or yellowish-white crystalline powder, with a melting point of from 189 to 192 C. An outline of its properties follows:

Formula: The acid titration corresponds with the formula C6H8O6.3

Solubility: It is freely soluble in water and also soluble in acetone, acetic ether and propyl alcohol, and insoluble in ethyl ether and purified petroleum benzine.4

Stability: It oxidizes on exposure to air and light. In an inert atmosphere it is quite stable to moderate heat, even in alkaline solution.5 It is decomposed when heated above 185 C.3a

Reducing power: It has a high reducing power. This reducing power is the more remarkable since the

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