[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1936

COOPERATIVE CLINICAL STUDIES IN THE TREATMENT OF SYPHILIS: CARDIOVASCULAR SYPHILISII. SYPHILITIC AORTIC REGURGITATION: ITS TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND; WASHINGTON, D. C.; With the Cooperation of Joseph Earle Moore, M.D., Baltimore; Paul A. O'Leary, M.D., Rochester, Minn.; John H. Stokes, M.D., Philadelphia; Udo J. Wile, M.D., Ann Arbor, Mich.; Thomas Parran Jr., M.D., and R. A. Vonderlehr, M.D., Washington, D. C.

From the syphilis clinics of the Western Reserve University, the Johns Hopkins University, the Mayo Clinic, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan, assisted by the United States Public Health Service, with the financial support of an anonymous donor.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1936;57(5):910-918. doi:10.1001/archinte.1936.00170090075005
Abstract

One of the gravest cardiovascular complications of syphilis is that of aortic regurgitation. A complicating aortitis is always present; occasionally an aneurysm accompanies the picture, and all too often there is secondary myocarditis or congestive heart failure. The tendency in the United States seems to be to put even a graver prognosis on this disease than is done in England. Scott1 estimated the duration of life for patients with untreated aortic regurgitation at from one to two years from the onset of symptoms. On the other hand, Moore and his co-workers,2 in their recent report of statistics, gave the average duration of life from the onset of symptoms to death or the last observation as thirty months with little or no treatment administered, while the time was increased to sixty-four months with adequate treatment of more than one year. In the first paper of this series on cardiovascular

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×