[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1936

CONTROL OF HYPERTHYROIDISM FOLLOWING PARTIAL THYROIDECTOMY: BY REMOVAL OF UNUSUALLY SMALL AMOUNTS OF THYROID TISSUE

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine and the Division of Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1936;57(6):1104-1114. doi:10.1001/archinte.1936.00170100047005
Abstract

The results of surgical treatment of exophthalmic goiter are today most gratifying and compare favorably with those of other operations of equal magnitude. As practiced at the Mayo Clinic, the operation of subtotal thyroidectomy, in which is preserved a posteromesial portion of each lobe equivalent to from a sixth to a third of a lobe of normal size, is comparatively free from technical complications, such as parathyroid tetany and injury to the inferior laryngeal nerve. Since the standardization of the preoperative treatment with iodine, the operation has been performed on approximately nine thousand patients with exophthalmic goiter, with a mortality of 0.8 per cent. The late results are equally gratifying. Within from two to four weeks after operation the basal metabolic rate is usually within normal limits, and after the lapse of one, three and five years more than 90 per cent of the patients consider themselves improved or as

×