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Article
August 1936

PITUITARY BASOPHILISM (CUSHING'S SYNDROME)REPORT OF A VERIFIED CASE, WITH A DISCUSSION OF THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Departments of Internal Medicine and Surgery, Medical School, University of Michigan.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1936;58(2):187-212. doi:10.1001/archinte.1936.00170120003001
Abstract

In 1932 Cushing1 described the clinical syndrome of pituitary basophilism, now frequently referred to as Cushing's syndrome. In 1933 he published additional information pertinent to this interesting condition and listed fourteen verified cases reported in the literature. Most of these were originally recorded as examples of multiglandular disease. The significance of the pituitary lesion (if found at the time) was not appreciated.

The general interest in this newly described syndrome is indicated by the increasing number of cases recognized clinically. How many of these clinical diagnoses will be substantiated by pathologic proof time alone will tell. Eight cases2 of the typical syndrome of pituitary basophilism in which a basophil adenoma of the pituitary gland was found at postmortem examination have been reported since Cushing's review (1933).3 The important features of these cases, together with those of a verified case (herein reported), appear in table 1.

Several observations of unusual interest

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