[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.134.98. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1937

RENAL INSUFFICIENCY FROM BLOOD TRANSFUSION: I. RELATION TO URINARY ACIDITY

Author Affiliations

Associate in Internal Medicine, State University of Iowa IOWA CITY; Intern, Henry Ford Hospital DETROIT; Assistant Professor of Physiological Chemistry, Woman's Medical College PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Internal Medicine, the State University of Iowa.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;59(3):432-444. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00170190067004
Abstract

From 1667, when the first blood transfusion was given to man by Jean Baptiste Denys,1 until the discovery of hemagglutination by Landsteiner2 in 1901 and the classification of blood groups by Janský3 (1907) and Moss4 (1910), hemoglobinuria was accepted as a common accompaniment of the injection of blood intravenously. In many of the patients who showed hemoglobin in the urine renal insufficiency developed, and death followed. Since testing the donor's and the recipient's blood for agglutination has become common, the incidence of severe complications from blood transfusions has, fortunately, greatly diminished. Hesse and Filatov18a reported a mortality of 1.3 per cent from 750 transfusions in Leningrad. They estimated that in general the mortality in various clinics was between 0.5 and 1.5 per cent. Tiber5 (1930) reported 2 deaths from 1,467 transfusions (0.013 per cent) at Bellevue Hospital. Witts6 described 3 deaths in 3,430 transfusions in Great

×