[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.204.227.250. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1937

ANATOMIC FEATURES OF THE CARDIAC ORIFICE OF THE STOMACH: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CARDIOSPASM

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;59(3):474-511. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00170190109007
Abstract

The clinical problems which concern the lower end of the esophagus and the cardiac orifice of the stomach are basically anatomic problems. The occurrence and nature of esophageal varices depend on the venous supply and the anastomoses across the cardia, as has been demonstrated by Kegaries.1 The study of peptic ulcer of the esophagus raises the question of the competence of the sphincteric action of the cardia in preventing the regurgitation of gastric juice and also the question of the occurrence of islands of gastric mucosa in the esophagus. Carcinoma of the cardia and the lower extremity of the esophagus also is of extreme anatomic interest. The peculiar glandular epithelium which is present at the cardia might be expected to give rise to neoplasms which have different properties from those of neoplasms which originate elsewhere in the stomach and esophagus. Moreover, the metastasis of a carcinoma at the cardia

×