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Article
June 1937

POISONING FROM CUTANEOUS APPLICATION OF IODINE: A RARE ASPECT OF ITS TOXICOLOGIC PROPERTIES

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Medical Service of the New Haven Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;59(6):952-966. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00170220028002
Abstract

Iodine was discovered accidentally by Courtois in 1811.1 It was first used as a therapeutic agent by Coindet in 1820 in treating goiter. Its success was so great that it was soon used in many other diseases, but the unfortunate results consequent on the inhalation of the nascent fumes caused it to fall somewhat into disrepute. However, other effective uses were soon discovered. Ricord in 1836 used it in scrofula, Lugol in 1831 used it effectively in tertiary syphilis, and Wallace in 1836 published a report of a series of cases in which potassium iodide in large doses was used in the treatment of syphilis. Boinet, in 1839, was the first to use iodine as an antiseptic, employing it in various infections; he originated the injection treatment of ovarian cysts. Since that time it has been used widely, and its alcoholic solutions are recognized as some of the most

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