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Article
July 1937

SICKLE CELL ANEMIA IN THE WHITE RACE: IMPROVEMENT IN TWO CASES FOLLOWING SPLENECTOMY

Author Affiliations

Head of Division on Medicine; CLEVELAND

From the Cleveland Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;60(1):133-142. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00180010138010
Abstract

Sickle cell anemia until recently has been thought to be limited to the Negro race. Even in this race it is relatively uncommon, although about 7 per cent of Negroes show sickling of the red blood cells when a film of fresh blood is sealed under a cover slip for several hours (latent sickling).1 The trait of sickling is an inborn defect2 in the erythrocyte; so it is fundamentally a disturbance of the bone marrow, just as the characteristic spherocytosis of congenital hemolytic icterus is an anatomic defect in the formation of erythrocytes.3 If sickle-shaped cells circulate in the blood stream, they are rapidly filtered out of the circulation by the spleen, just as are the spherocytes in congenital hemolytic icterus. The anemia characteristic of meniscocytosis is hemolytic anemia with good response of the marrow, since the bilirubin content of the blood plasma is increased and the

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