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Article
August 1937

THALAMIC SYNDROMESYNDROME OF THE POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; A REVIEW

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;60(2):203-224. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00180020027003
Abstract

The thalamic syndrome was first described by Dejerine and Egger1 in 1903. Perhaps the subject can best be introduced by a description of the first classic case.

Early one spring morning in the year 1902 an elderly woman named Madame Jossaume ate breakfast with her usual relish. Afterward she sat back and perhaps mused over some of the events of her seventy-six years of life. Suddenly she felt dizzy. She fell to her knees, and everything seemed to swim about her. Then she began to vomit violently. She did not faint but was unable to get up without help. The family put her to bed. She was seized with an imperative desire to micturate without being able to do so. She tried to move her extremities but found that her left arm and leg were leaden and inert.

Fifteen days later the paralysis began to disappear, and soon Madame

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