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Article
November 1937

METABOLISM OF SODIUM d-LACTATE: I. UTILIZATION OF INTRAVENOUSLY INJECTED SODIUM d-LACTATE BY NORMAL PERSONS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Medical Service of Dr. George Baehr and the Division of Laboratories, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;60(5):876-881. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00180050143010
Abstract

The object of these experiments was to study the utilization of sodium d-lactate by human beings both under normal conditions and in the presence of certain pathologic processes. D-lactic acid represents an intermediary stage in carbohydrate metabolism in the cycle involving striated muscle and liver. The confusion which has arisen concerning the conversion of lactic acid into glycogen is in part due to the failure to realize the difference in the nature of the utilization of the d and l forms. Thus, Meyerhof and Lohmann1 pointed out that isolated hepatic tissue of the rat was able to synthesize carbohydrate from d-lactic acid but hardly from l-lactic acid. Cori and Cori2 have pointed out that if 95 mg. per hundred grams of body weight of d-lactic acid per hour is injected into rats, there occurs no appreciable increase in the lactic acid content of either the blood or the urine,

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