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Article
December 1937

RELATION OF KIDNEYS TO BLOOD PRESSURE: EFFECTS OF EXTRACTS OF KIDNEYS OF NORMAL DOGS AND OF DOGS WITH RENAL HYPERTENSION ON BLOOD PRESSURE OF RATS

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the departments of Medicine, Surgery and Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;60(6):1058-1068. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00180060111011
Abstract

Goldblatt and his co-workers1 have recently shown that a sustained increase in blood pressure may be produced in dogs by partial occlusion of the renal arteries. This observation has been confirmed by numerous investigators, including Page,2 Prinzmetal and Friedman3 and ourselves. Since the hypertension is not relieved by denervation of the kidney, can be produced in animals subjected to previous renal denervation2 and occurs even when the kidney has been transplanted into the neck,4 the rise in blood pressure appears to be of "chemical" rather than "nervous" origin.

Hartwich5 showed that ureteral ligation caused a rise in blood pressure in dogs. Similar results were reported by others,6 who found that previous denervation of the kidney did not prevent the effect. It has recently been observed7 that ureteral ligation may cause a well marked diminution of the blood flow through the kidneys of unanesthetized dogs. Since ischemia of the

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