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Article
February 1938

ATYPICAL FACIAL NEURALGIA: AN ANALYSIS OF TWO HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1938;61(2):172-183. doi:10.1001/archinte.1938.00180080014002
Abstract

The occurrence of continuous and obscure pains about the face and head for which the usual methods of relief, both medical and surgical, have as a rule failed has been the subject of considerable investigation since 1920. The patients whose records are here analyzed have run the gantlet of numerous physicians, both local and foreign, 1 patient (who is a physician) having visited 126 physicians in America and on the Continent. Useless and meddlesome surgical procedures have been performed not only on the trigeminal tract but on the nasal sinuses, the abdomen and the pelvis, and there has been wholesale extraction of teeth as well. Peculiarly enough, not only have these operations failed to accomplish their purpose, but in practically all cases the pain has been much worse thereafter.

Though many of these patients complain bitterly of pain during the examination, their facies rarely indicate such severity. This is in

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