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Article
April 1938

CLINICAL STUDIES IN CIRCULATORY ADJUSTMENTS: IV. OBLITERATING PULMONARY ARTERITIS WITH SECONDARY PULMONARY CHANGES AND RIGHT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY; REPORT OF A CASE WITH AUTOPSY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Medicine and the Department of Pathology, the Beth Israel Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1938;61(4):600-608. doi:10.1001/archinte.1938.00180090080006
Abstract

Thrombo-angiitis obliterans, or Buerger's disease, is a well recognized clinical entity. In the majority of cases the condition is localized in one group of arteries,1 but in some cases it may even invade neighboring veins, in the form of phlebitis migrans. Obliterating arteritis, on the other hand, is confined to the smallest arterioles, without involvement of the venous system. Hence, these two conditions must be considered apart pathologically and clinically.

Despite the fact that obliterating arteritis is a rare disease, the recent clinical significance attributed to it warrants reporting a case in which we have had the opportunity of following the disease from onset to termination.

REPORT OF CASE  D. P., a man aged 33, experienced sudden pain in the chest, with dyspnea, six months before admission to the hospital. He consulted his family physician, but the only objective findings were tachypnea and tachycardia. He continued to work, with

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