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Article
June 1938

EXOPHTHALMIC GOITER: RELATION BETWEEN THE BLOOD IODINE LEVEL AND THE DURATION OF SYMPTOMS IN THREE HUNDRED AND FIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Research Foundation and the Department of Surgery, the Lahey Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1938;61(6):875-879. doi:10.1001/archinte.1938.00180110030004
Abstract

Recent investigations concerning the quantitative estimation of the iodine content of the blood have led to a better understanding of the metabolism of iodine in goitrous conditions. Evidence has been brought forward to show that the iodine level of the blood is elevated in approximately 70 per cent of the cases of clinical hyperthyroidism; in the remaining 30 per cent the level is within the range of normal.1 In former communications2 the observation was made that in the greater proportion of cases of hyperthyroidism in which the iodine content of the blood was normal the response to therapy was less favorable than in the cases in which the iodine content was elevated. The duration of hyperthyroidism is recognized clinically as influencing the therapeutic response, in that patients with thyrotoxic symptoms of long standing usually react less favorably to treatment than do those with a history of recent onset

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