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Article
August 1938

CULTURE OF HUMAN MARROW: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF SULFANILAMIDE AND ANTIPNEUMOCOCCUS SERUM ON THE COURSE OF EXPERIMENTAL PNEUMOCOCCIC INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

With The Technical Assistance of Inez E. Brownlee, B.A. PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Department of Medicine and the Division of Experimental Medicine, University of Oregon Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1938;62(2):181-198. doi:10.1001/archinte.1938.00180130002001
Abstract

The pneumococcus was chosen for this study because of the great clinical importance of pneumococcic infections and because the studies that have been published have given conflicting and inconclusive results.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  The vaccine vial technic of culture of human marrow1 permits quantitative studies of the interaction of living human cells and noxious and therapeutic agents. Studies of the mode of action of sulfanilamide on experimental infections due to beta hemolytic streptococci2 indicated that sulfanilamide itself did not kill the organisms but rendered them vulnerable to bactericidal substances present in normal human serum, probably by preventing the formation, or by neutralization, of the toxins or aggressins of the organisms. These studies also indicated that the concentration of sulfanilamide necessary to control hemolytic streptococcic infections in the cultures was about 1: 100,000 instead of 1: 10,000, which had previously been recommended, and that even short periods without

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