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Article
August 1938

REMOVAL OF INTRAVENOUSLY INJECTED BROMSULPHALEIN FROM THE BLOOD STREAM OF THE DOG: A COMPARISON OF THE REMOVAL OF INTRAVENOUSLY INJECTED BILIRUBIN AND THAT OF BROMSULPHALEIN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Pathology, Department of Bacteriology and Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1938;62(2):216-221. doi:10.1001/archinte.1938.00180130037003
Abstract

We1 have previously reported observations on the effect of various experimental procedures on the removal of intravenously injected bilirubin from the blood stream of the dog. These observations may be briefly summarized as follows: The normal rate of removal is extremely rapid when compared with that in man; it is characterized by a prompt disappearance of 50 to 60 per cent of the amount injected within the first five minutes and a subsequent progressive decline in the plasma levels so that bilirubin is no longer detectable in the plasma after sixty to ninety minutes with a 5 mg. per kilogram dose and after ninety to one hundred and twenty minutes with a 10 mg. per kilogram dose; anesthesia produces a definite impairment in the rate of removal; obstruction of the bile ducts results in an immediate complete impairment of removal; reticuloendothelial blockade produces a slight but definite impairment, and

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