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Article
January 1939

EFFECT OF LARGE DOSES OF INSULIN ON THE PROTEINS AND THE COLLOID OSMOTIC PRESSURE OF BLOOD SERUM

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1939;63(1):156-164. doi:10.1001/archinte.1939.00180180166011
Abstract

The recent widespread use of "insulin shock" therapy for schizophrenia (dementia praecox) makes it desirable to evaluate more precisely the effects of large doses of insulin on the protein in the blood serum of human beings. Traumatic and the other more common types of shock are characterized by general hemoconcentration involving both red blood cells and plasma protein; the clinical sequence of falling blood pressure, rising pulse rate and circulatory collapse is referable to a loss of fluid from the blood to the tissues. It is not at all certain that any similar loss of fluid occurs in "insulin shock."

The term insulin anhydremia has been used to describe the effect of insulin in bringing about a rapid and large increase in the hemoglobin concentration of the blood.1 It is doubtful whether this designation is applicable, because, in contrast with the changes in the hemoglobin concentration, variable changes in

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