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Article
April 1939

THE PRECORDIAL LEADI. FINDINGS FOR PATIENTS WITH NORMAL HEARTS AND THOSE WITH HEART DISEASE OTHER THAN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1939;63(4):711-731. doi:10.1001/archinte.1939.00180210104007
Abstract

Since the introduction of the use of the precordial lead in clinical electrocardiography, as the result of the work of Wilson1 and of Wolferth and Wood,2 enough data have been accumulated to establish it as a helpful and at times necessary procedure in the diagnosis of cardiac disorders. But as frequently occurs with any new procedure, further study becomes essential to define its limitations and its proper value. After the three conventional leads were first introduced into general use, physicians had to become familiar with the wide range of variations in normal electrocardiograms before they could interpret any abnormality. Moreover, it was quickly found that many factors besides disease of the heart could alter the form of the tracings. Among these factors were the effect of digitalis and of the drinking of ice water on the T wave and the alterations that resulted from deep breathing, from the

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