[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1939

BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITISREPORT OF A CASE IN WHICH THE CAUSE WAS ACTINOMYCES BOVIS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1939;64(1):84-90. doi:10.1001/archinte.1939.00190010094008
Abstract

The clinical syndrome of subacute bacterial endocarditis occurs frequently and is today a well recognized entity. Little has been added to knowledge of the subject since Libman's publications.1 It is now well known that while Streptococcus viridans is the most common cause of this disease, a large variety of other bacteria may produce a similar picture. Among these are Bacillus influenzae, Enterococcus, Meningococcus, Bacillus diphtheriae, Pneumococcus, Gonococcus and organisms of the Brucella group. However, the occurrence of a similar clinical picture caused by higher bacteria is rare. Only 1 case—that of Jervell,2 in which the condition was caused by Leptothrix—is to be found in the literature. For this reason, the case to be described is of unusual interest, since the causative agent of the disease was found to be Actinomyces bovis.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —W. J., a 24 year old American-born Jew, a chiropodist, was admitted to

×