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Article
August 1939

HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICEIMMEDIATE AND DELAYED CHANGES IN THE BLOOD AFTER SPLENECTOMY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1939;64(2):268-279. doi:10.1001/archinte.1939.00190020054004
Abstract

That splenectomy causes a "clinical cure" of hemolytic jaundice has been well known for some time, but only recently has our attention been called to the immediacy of the changes in the blood that follow the operation.1 In the past four years 26 cases of typical familial hemolytic jaundice have been observed,2 in 12 of which the spleen was removed without fatality. Eight of the splenectomized patients have been subjected to careful detailed study with special reference to changes occurring in the blood during and immediately after splenectomy. It is our purpose to present the results of this study together with control observations on 5 additional cases of "refractory" anemia in which splenectomy was performed. We hope that our additional information concerning the action of the spleen will be of some clinical value to the physician in his understanding and handling of the patient with hemolytic jaundice.

METHODS 

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