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Article
September 1939

PRIMARY CARCINOMA OF THE LIVERTUMOR THROMBOSIS OF THE INFERIOR VENA CAVA AND RIGHT AURICLE

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1939;64(3):566-578. doi:10.1001/archinte.1939.00190030159011
Abstract

The comparative rarity of primary carcinoma of the liver is shown by the figures of Rowen and Mallory,1 who found 7 instances of this condition in 6,506 consecutive autopsies. Orth2 found 4 cases of primary carcinoma of the liver in 258 cases of hepatic cancer and in 713 cases of cancer of all types. Goldzieher and Bokay3 encountered this disease 18 times in 6,000 necropsies. Hansemann4 and Rindfleisch5 concluded from their studies that primary carcinoma of the liver represents about 0.5 per cent of all cancers.

Ewing6 stated that metastasis occurs infrequently. Of 163 cases of primary carcinoma of the liver studied by Eggel,7 46, or 28 per cent, showed no extensions, and in 50, or 30 per cent, metastasis was limited to the branches of the hepatic or the portal veins. The lungs were the most frequent extrahepatic site of metastasis.

The great infrequency with which tumor thrombosis

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