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Article
January 1940

ATROPHIC GASTRITIS: GASTROSCOPIC STUDIES ON THE EFFECTS OF LIVER AND IRON THERAPY: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Gastroenterology, The School of Medicine of the Division of the Biological Sciences, University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;65(1):78-89. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190070088006
Abstract

Chronic atrophic gastritis constitutes 13.6 per cent of gastric diseases. It is found constantly in cases of pernicious anemia, sprue and combined cord degeneration and in many cases of gastric carcinoma, in which it apparently precedes the development of the tumor. However, atrophic gastritis occurs without associated diseases and appears to be a primary disease entity. The cause is unknown; in rare cases the disease follows acute corrosive gastritis (such as that from acids or lyes), but most often chronic superficial gastritis precedes its development.

The gross anatomic features of this condition are best observed through the gastroscope. The gastric mucosa is not the orange-red of the normal mucosa but grayish pink, gray or greenish gray. It may be so thinned that the blood vessels of the submucosa become visible as blue or red arborizations. The atrophic changes are present either as sharply limited patches or as diffuse atrophic areas,

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