[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1940

SYNDROME OF PSEUDOBULBAR PALSY: AN ANATOMIC AND PHYSIOLOGIC ANALYSIS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the subdepartment of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, and the Medical Division of the Baltimore City Hospitals.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;65(1):106-121. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190070116008
Abstract

Pseudobulbar palsy is a syndrome about which little is known in spite of the fact that it not uncommonly follows cerebral vascular accidents and other forms of neurologic disease. It is our purpose, therefore, to present an anatomic and physiologic analysis of this condition.

Magnus1 first reported a case in which there were features characteristic of pseudobulbar palsy following multiple apoplectic attacks; he discussed the postmortem observations. Jolly2 described a patient with multiple sclerosis and "progressive bulbar paralysis" whose bulbar nuclei were normal at autopsy; Barlow3 emphasized the relation of bilateral cortical lesions to the syndrome. Ross4 reviewed cases from an anatomic-functional point of view, and Oppenheim and Siemerling5 differentiated pseudobulbar from true bulbar palsy. Hunter and Robertson6 and Oettinger7 reported typical cases.

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS  The designation "pseudobulbar palsy" is a misnomer. The term supranuclear bulbar paralysis would be more accurate. This term indicates the general position of the lesion

×