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Article
February 1940

ATYPICAL FACIAL NEURALGIA: DIAGNOSIS, CAUSE AND TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;65(2):340-367. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190080122008
Abstract

From 1908 to 1916 Sluder1 wrote a series of articles in which he described a neuralgic pain based on involvement of the sphenopalatine ganglion and the sphenoid sinus. It was true that some patients with this peculiar pain were relieved by therapy directed toward the sphenopalatine ganglion and sphenoid sinus, but there was a group of other patients who were thought to have sphenopalatine neuralgia but whose pain Sluder himself was unable to relieve by this therapy. Pains of this variety were described by Oppenheim,2 Cushing,3 Harris4 and Davis.5 In 1924, for the first time, Frazier and Russell6 segregated a group of patients from those with characteristic trigeminal neuralgia and suggested that because of the peculiar nature of their pains, and for want of a better term, their disease be called "atypical neuralgia." In 1928 I7 segregated 143 patients with atypical neuralgia from those with typical trigeminal neuralgia and described

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