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Article
September 1940

SPONTANEOUS HYPOGLYCEMIA DUE TO ATROPHY OF THE ADRENAL GLANDS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Medicine, the Mayo Foundation; Assistant Surgeon, the Mayo Clinic ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Pathologic Anatomy, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;66(3):531-540. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190150002001
Abstract

It has been established that hypoglycemia may be due to a variety of causes. In some cases disturbance of the islets of Langerhans, such as hyperplasia,1 adenoma2 or carcinoma,3 has been responsible. In other instances disease of the liver4 or insufficiency of the pituitary body5 or of the adrenal glands6 has given rise to severe and at times fatal hypoglycemic attacks. There have been reported numerous other explanations for hypoglycemia, such as lactation, muscular wasting, renal glycosuria, excessive fatigue and fasting.7 These conditions only rarely produce severe symptoms. Because cases of severe spontaneous hypoglycemia of extrapancreatic origin are less frequently reported than cases of hypoglycemia due to islet cell changes, it is of interest to report a case in which the hypoglycemia is considered due to insufficiency of the adrenal glands.

REPORT OF CASE  The patient was admitted to the Rochester State Hospital on Feb. 7, 1939, with a history

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