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Article
November 1940

ANATOMIC FOUNDATION OF ANACIDITY: A GASTROSCOPIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO; AKRON, OHIO; CHICAGO

From the Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;66(5):1060-1078. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190170051003
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  Anacidity has been considered one of the most important disturbances of the gastric function and often has been treated in textbooks as a separate disease.1 It has become customary to consider anacidity as either "functional" or "organic."

I. FUNCTIONAL ANACIDITY  Several theories have been advanced to explain the failure of anatomically normal cells to secrete acid: —It was believed that in patients with anacidity the cells themselves were able to produce acid but that they did not do so because a psychogenic barrier was established between the central nervous system and the end organs. Such a condition would be similar to certain other psychogenic disturbances. In hysterical paralysis, for instance, the paralyzed muscle has the potential faculty to contract but cannot contract because of psychogenic inhibition. Certain authors have presented evidence to prove the psychogenic origin of anacidity. Pavlov,2 Bickel3 and others have demonstrated in experi

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