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Article
March 1941

EPIDEMIC POLIOMYELITIS, RECURRENT ENCEPHALOMENINGORADICULITIS AND FIBROMYOSITIS: IN RELATION TO STREPTOCOCCI OBTAINED FROM A WATER SUPPLY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(3):531-545. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200030061004
Abstract

The epidemic of poliomyelitis concerned was atypical in many respects.1 Older children and young adults were chiefly stricken. Weakness of muscles associated with severe pain and other symptoms indicating involvement of the brain, posterior horns, nerve roots, nerves and muscles was common, whereas complete flaccid paralysis of even small muscle groups was rare. Convalescence of patients was often greatly prolonged, but ultimate recovery was usually complete. Recurring exacerbations with progression and change of symptoms and lesions occurred in some cases, culminating in a strange and painful disease or state, well designated by the descriptive term "encephalomeningoradiculitis with fibromyositis." The virus was readily demonstrated in the spinal cord2 of patients who died of poliomyelitis during the epidemic but was demonstrated with difficulty in nasopharyngeal washings.3 During a study of the epidemic in 1934 it was found that streptococci isolated from the nasopharynx, urine, stools, spinal fluid and spinal

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