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Article
March 1941

ACUTE SCLEROSING VASCULAR DISEASE WITH RENAL CHANGES: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(3):579-589. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200030109007
Abstract

The clinicopathologic entity of bilateral cortical necrosis of the kidneys has been well recognized, especially since the comprehensive summary, which included 2 of the author's own cases, published by Ash1 in 1933. Many articles presenting more examples of this strange condition have appeared since then.2 In all the clinical course was characterized by one or more of the following features: absence of premonitory signs or symptoms of renal damage; acute onset of the illness (frequently subsequent to the termination of pregnancy); reduction or suppression of urinary output; elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressures (in about one half of the cases); headache, unconsciousness and convulsions (the last occurring in about one third of the cases); vomiting and diarrhea, and a short course, terminating fatally in one to nineteen days. Coma usually preceded death. Albuminuria and the presence of erythrocytes and casts in specimens of urine examined were almost

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