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Article
March 1941

JEJUNAL (ANASTOMOTIC) ULCER: A CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC STUDY WITH REPORT OF EIGHT CASES ENCOUNTERED IN 13,000 NECROPSIES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Pathology, Cook County Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, University of Illinois.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(3):609-619. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200030139010
Abstract

In recent years there have been many contributions to the literature on gastrojejunal, or anastomotic, ulcer. However, few studies of the lesion as encountered during postmortem examination have been reported. Our study concerned 8 cases observed in a series of 13,000 consecutive necropsies performed from 1929 to 1940 at the Cook County Hospital. Two of our cases were included in a paper by Portis and Jaffé.1

Primary jejunal ulcer is rare. Judd2 in 1921 stated he had never seen a case and questioned its occurrence. Ebeling3 in 1933, under the title of "Primary Jejunal Ulcer," reported a case in which diagnosis was made by roentgen examination prior to operation and enumerated 46 other cases reported from 1827 to 1932. However, the ulcers in these cases were primary in the sense that they were not secondary to gastrojejunostomy. The author expressed the belief that the primary etiologic agent

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