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Article
June 1941

INFARCTION OF THE LUNGA CLINICAL AND ROENTGENOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Departments of Roentgenology and Medicine of Cleveland City Hospital and Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(6):1144-1156. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200060047006
Abstract

The clinical recognition of pulmonary infarction in many instances is difficult. This is illustrated by the fact that in only 22 per cent of our cases was the condition diagnosed correctly ante mortem. This study was made in an attempt to correlate the clinical and roentgenologic data with the pathologic observations and thus improve our diagnostic accuracy.

From Jan. 1, 1930 to Dec. 31, 1939 6,548 autopsies were performed at Cleveland City Hospital. Among these were found 344 instances of aseptic hemorrhagic infarction of the lung, an incidence of 5.2 per cent. In 174 of these 344 cases the infarct was considered to be the major cause of death or an important contributory factor. The infarct was considered significant if it was 5 cm. in size or larger. Multiple infarcts, even if smaller, were considered significant. However, even if it was large, the infarct was classified as unimportant if another

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