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Article
July 1941

THROMBOSIS OF THE DEEP VEINS OF THE LEG: ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE AS EXEMPLIFIED IN THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-ONE AUTOPSIES

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.; SPOKANE, WASH.

From the Department of Pathology, University of Oregon Medical School, and the Pathological Laboratories of St. Vincent's Hospital, Portland, and Western State Hospital, Fort Steilacoom, Wash.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;68(1):1-17. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200070011001
Abstract

Generally accepted facts are not invariably supported by published data. The voluminous literature on venous thrombosis contains surprisingly little pertaining to the deep veins of the calf. This is scarcely attributable to ignorance or to a lack of appreciation of phlebothrombosis in this part of the body. Experienced necroscopists have long been aware that the legs constitute a common, though often clinically silent, reservoir of clot formation during life and at autopsy seek here when other more readily accessible sources of embolism have failed. Rather, it appears to us that such factors as antagonism on the part of embalmers toward extensive dissection, restrictions imposed by relatives and ambiguity or possible interpretations of the laws pertaining to mutilation may be more potent reasons for the paucity of figures with respect to this part of the body.

Much credit for the recognition of the common occurrence and the clinical importance of venous

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