[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1941

STUDIES ON "ESSENTIAL" HYPERTENSION: II. THE ASSOCIATION OF HYPERTENSION WITH ORGANIC RENAL DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;68(2):261-293. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200080083006
Abstract

The role which the kidneys play in the genesis of arterial hypertension has been the subject of discussion since the days of Richard Bright. For many years it was believed that increased arterial pressure was accompanied by disease of the kidneys. Gull and Sutton1 were the first, however, to suggest that high arterial pressure might be attributed to "arterio-capillary fibrosis." The present conception of "essential" hypertension, a condition in which the blood pressure is elevated without failure of the kidneys, is an outgrowth of the contributions of Allbutt,2 Janeway3 and Volhard and Fahr.4 The term "essential" hypertension continues to connote a condition characterized by the absence of diseases to which elevated arterial pressure is considered secondary and as such is of inexact meaning. Since the work of Goldblatt5 in producing experimental hypertension by interference with the renal blood supply, the importance of the kidneys in

×